Tag Archives: what do when your hard drive crashes

Learning about Hard Drives the Hard Way

8 Mar

Last week I spent several hours investigating the pros and cons of the myriad of online backup solutions on the Internet. In case you didn’t know, I recently experienced another hard drive crash.  Although I try to double back-up all my data on external hard drives, sometimes life gets in the way and an important document falls through the cracks.

This is exactly what happened a couple of weeks ago when I lost some valuable information including my business plan and brainstorming notes, as well as the master file for my trifold brochure. With that being said, I’ve decided to move forward with an investment in an online solution that automatically backs up certain folders.  This plan is in addition to double backing up data on my external hard drives.

Before moving further, let’s discuss what I recently learned about hard drives and why it is critical to use an online provider in addition to doing it yourself.

#1) Hard drive failure is commonplace nowadays. Please don’t think it that it can’t happen to you. Data recovery expert Tom Buhnerkempe, proprietor of Chandler Data Professionals, is seeing a lot more drives fail nowadays. He says companies are not making hard drives the way they used to make them. One of the biggest culprits is the size of the hard drive. The larger hard drives with more space have higher rates of failure.

Apparently, the larger hard drives are essentially the same size as the smaller hard driver, but they are being used to store much more information on them. In turn, this puts extra stress on the machine and also degrades the overall quality of the product. Another reason for the high rate failures is the quality of workmanship. Hard drives are simply not being built as well. The lower prices are driving down the overall quality of the products and the parts within those machines are failing more often.

#2) There are two types of hard drive failure:  mechanical failure and software failure. Mechanical failure is the much more serious of the two because it involves having to replace specific parts of the machine to try to get the drive to function properly again in order to access the data. This process isn’t nearly as simple as getting a new car battery where different brands and types will universally work.  The drive has to be the same, and hard drive manufacturers do not make spare parts. 

Once the problem is determined, a similar version of the drive must be purchased and certified, and then taken apart one piece at a time. If these parts are internal, this usually results in a very costly procedure. It requires specific skills sets and as well as highly specialized machines. Tom likened it to the rebuilding of a car engine. Further, repairs are very time consuming. Costs can easily exceed $1000 and take several months. There are only a number of companies in the United States that can successfully complete these repairs For the unfortunate owner in this situation, you are either out a considerable amount of  money or lots of data, whichever is worth more to you.

If your hard  drive fails due to software corruption, meaning there is enough corrupted information saved in system causing it to malfunction, the remedy is a bit  simpler. Repairs typically can be done locally, if you live in a metropolitan area, although it still can be costly. The key is the drive stills mechanically operates correctly.

One more thing that is worth mentioning is some people like to link or daisy chain up their hard drives to one another so you are saving information on more than one drive.  That way if one drive fails, you still have one or two others that are working. The problem is if the hard drive is damaged because of the mechanical failure of another mechanism within the computer, like the power supply or motherboard, it could conceivably damage all the hard drives at once, ruining everything.

This is where the online system of  backing up your data comes in handy.  I’ll share with you some time saving links, the company I chose, and what factors were in important in making my decision. I hope you enjoyed this post and found it informational. If so, drop me a line with your comments.

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